Link 27 Nov 299 notes Revolutionize Education: Why do I have to learn this? »

allisonunsupervised:

Because it’s good exercise.

Because you live in this universe, and it’s good to know how it works.

Because it’s a ticket.

Because it’s the foundation.

Because it leads to other things.

Because you don’t actually know where you’ll end up.

Because the world is…

Video 18 Nov 55,224 notes

politics-war:

Founder of a free school for slum children Rajesh Kumar Sharma, second from right, and Laxmi Chandra, right, write on black boards, painted on a building wall, at a free school run under a metro bridge in New Delhi, India. At least 30 children living in the nearby slums have been receiving free education from this school for the last three years.

Link 20 Aug 28 notes Cool Cat Teacher Blog: 12 Reasons to Blog with Your Students»

world-shaker:

Here are two (click through for the rest):

  1. Blogging is a different form of writing than the essay.

    There are so many nuances to blogging. You can write in first person, second person or third person. In fact, when I go through an article and take out the “I’s” and put in third person my engagement levels go DOWN with the post.
  2. Blogging encourages student voice.

    First person writing lets the students share who they are.
Photo 19 Aug 391 notes talesofan8thgradeteacher:

Reblogging so I can make this tomorrow. I’m going to hang it in my room as a basic, concise guideline and I love that “justify” is defined right on the chart. I always feel like my kids go, “What do you mean by justify again?”

talesofan8thgradeteacher:

Reblogging so I can make this tomorrow. I’m going to hang it in my room as a basic, concise guideline and I love that “justify” is defined right on the chart. I always feel like my kids go, “What do you mean by justify again?”

(Source: classroomcollective)

Photo 19 Aug 177 notes
Link 19 Aug 57 notes Five Smart Habits to Develop for Back to School»

world-shaker:

Here’s one:

2. BECOME AN EXPERT IN ONE TOOL

There are at least half a dozen apps and software for every job. Should you use Diigo, Delicious, eduClipper, Pinterest, or BagTheWeb to collect links? Is Photoshop, GIMP, Pixlr, or FotoFlexer the right photo-editing software? It’s overwhelming, and there really is no single right answer. (For the record, though, Diigo is great because of its iOS app and GIMP works well because it’s both free and powerful.) So pick one class of tools and become a ninja in how to use one of the leading tools in that class. Skills from one platform are transferable to the others. You will benefit from learning everything about whatever tool you choose.

Photo 19 Aug 204 notes
Photo 6 May 141 notes edspotlight:

Charles Blow in the NY Times today:
“A big part of the problem is that teachers have been so maligned in the national debate that it’s hard to attract our best and brightest to see it as a viable and rewarding career choice, even if they have a high aptitude and natural gift for it.  A 2010 McKinsey & Company report entitled “Closing the Talent Gap: Attracting and Retaining Top-Third Graduates to Careers in Teaching” found that top-performing nations like Singapore, Finland and South Korea recruit all of their teachers from the top third of graduates and then even screen from that group for “other important qualities.” By contrast, in the United States, ‘23 percent of new teachers come from the top third, and just 14 percent in high poverty schools, which find it especially difficult to attract and retain talented teachers. It is a remarkably large difference in approach, and in results.’”
Link to Graphic

edspotlight:

Charles Blow in the NY Times today:

“A big part of the problem is that teachers have been so maligned in the national debate that it’s hard to attract our best and brightest to see it as a viable and rewarding career choice, even if they have a high aptitude and natural gift for it.  A 2010 McKinsey & Company report entitled “Closing the Talent Gap: Attracting and Retaining Top-Third Graduates to Careers in Teaching” found that top-performing nations like Singapore, Finland and South Korea recruit all of their teachers from the top third of graduates and then even screen from that group for “other important qualities.” By contrast, in the United States, ‘23 percent of new teachers come from the top third, and just 14 percent in high poverty schools, which find it especially difficult to attract and retain talented teachers. It is a remarkably large difference in approach, and in results.’”

Link to Graphic

(Source: willrichardson)

via Spotlight.
Photo 18 Jul 196 notes positivelypersistentteach:

kbkonnected:

“Cheap” dry erase boards for the entire classroom. What a clever idea!
#elemchat #spedchat
Tons of ideas for this one. 

I love it!

positivelypersistentteach:

kbkonnected:

“Cheap” dry erase boards for the entire classroom. What a clever idea!

#elemchat #spedchat

Tons of ideas for this one. 

I love it!

Video 18 Jul 70 notes

world-shaker:

The President says one of the most plain and honest things I’ve ever heard about American politics.

(by whitehouse)

Link 26 Jun 10 notes How to Build a Calendar for Project-Based Learning»

world-shaker:

This is a great foundation for those of you interested in Project-Based Learning.

Link 13 Jun 3 notes Ed's Scribbles: 10 Tips for Maths Success»

dot-ed:

  1. Do all of the homework. Don’t ever think of homework as a choice. It’s the most important way that students practice and master the concepts taught in class. Set up a regular time and place that make doing the homework feel automatic.
  2. Fight not to miss class. Math class moves fast, teaching a new concept every day. What students do today builds towards tomorrow. Math punishes absences; to keep up, students have to make time to come back and learn what they missed. So if there’s an optional appointment to be made, take care not to schedule it during math.
  3. Find a friend to be your study partner. We all have reasons for legitimate absences. So find a friend who will take good notes when you’re gone and will call that night to fill you in on the homework. This is good practice for the real world, where building positive relationships is necessary to thrive. In more advanced classes, it’s a good idea to build a study group to practice for tests.
  4. Establish a good relationship with the teacher. High school teachers have up to 175 students, so it’s important to distinguish yourself. During the first week of school, introduce yourself. Let your teacher know that you are interested in her class, and welcome the opportunity to learn. Ask questions that show you’re paying attention. Parents should also introduce themselves, via e-mail or at Back-To-School night. Teachers respond best to students who show that they care about the class.
  5. Analyze and understand every mistake. Our culture has become perfection- focused, and it’s tempting to ignore our mistakes. Students want to pass over a mistake made on homework or a test, to just let it go. But it’s important to fix mistakes and understand why they were made; otherwise we’re doomed to repeat them. Take time to figure out the thinking behind a mistake, and figure out how to do it right. Ask the teacher if you’re unclear. In advanced classes, it can be helpful to write a paragraph of reflection about why errors were made.
  6. Get help fast. If a student realizes that something is difficult, he should seek as much help as possible as quickly as possible. Teachers are very receptive to requests for extra help. Straighten out misunderstandings before they start to snowball.
  7. Don’t swallow your questions. Questions are the vehicle by which we learn. If you have one, ask it. Chances are that many of your students have the same question. Saying it out loud will help you, your classmates, and the teacher. Asking good questions is a lifelong skill, and school is a safe place to practice. The more questions we ask, the easier it gets. A good teacher will respect all questions. If you feel that your teacher embarrasses you for asking a question, talk to your parents and have them tell the administration; this is a serious problem.
  8. Basic skills are essential. Quick: what’s 9 times 7? To be successful, students must be able to answer this correctly in their sleep. The multiplication tables are the basis for most high school math problems. If your child doesn’t know them, practice! Make flash cards, buy a computer program, and practice, practice, practice.
  9. Algebra I must be mastered. Algebra I skills are crucial to later math courses. Students must master skills like solving systems of equations, graphing, slope, and simplification of radicals. Don’t push students to take Algebra I until their teacher says they are ready. And if their Algebra grade is below a C, strongly consider re-taking the class. Even in Calculus, most problems consist of one difficult step, followed by ten steps of Algebra.
  10. Understand what the calculator is doing. It’s not enough to know how to use the calculator; students need to know what the answer means. They should ask themselves what the calculator is doing for them, and always analyze the calculator’s answer. For instance, if the teacher asks for “the square of negative three,” many students will type in “-3^2” which gives the answer “-9.” But the real answer is “(-3)^2”, or 9. Students should play around with their calculators and become familiar with the way they work.
Text 7 Jun 5 notes Teaching in China

My first teaching job will be in a Shenzhen, China. I will be teaching 7th, 8th, and 9th grade math. And, yes, I am very excited!

Do you have any advice for me?

Photo 7 Jun 870 notes This could be a potential attention getter in one of my history classes.

fuckyeahoddities:

How long can a chicken live without its head?
Well the record right now stands at 2 years. On 10th September, 1945, a young cockerel/rooster in Fruita, Colorado,  had it’s head chopped off and lived. Incredibly, the axe left the  jugular vein intact, and left enough of the brain stem to, apparently,  keep the rooster chirping. Mike, as he came to be known, was something  of a national celebrity in his time, featuring in Time magazine. His  owner, Lloyd Olsen, charged twenty-five cents to see ‘Mike the headless  wonder chicken’ in sideshows across the USA. At the height of his  career, Mike was making around $4,500 a week, and was valued at $10,000.  Mike was fed and watered using an eyedropper, but tragedy struck one  night when Mike’s owner had left his eyedropper at a previous show.  Unable to clear his airways, Mike choked to death.

This could be a potential attention getter in one of my history classes.

fuckyeahoddities:

How long can a chicken live without its head?

Well the record right now stands at 2 years. On 10th September, 1945, a young cockerel/rooster in Fruita, Colorado, had it’s head chopped off and lived. Incredibly, the axe left the jugular vein intact, and left enough of the brain stem to, apparently, keep the rooster chirping. Mike, as he came to be known, was something of a national celebrity in his time, featuring in Time magazine. His owner, Lloyd Olsen, charged twenty-five cents to see ‘Mike the headless wonder chicken’ in sideshows across the USA. At the height of his career, Mike was making around $4,500 a week, and was valued at $10,000. Mike was fed and watered using an eyedropper, but tragedy struck one night when Mike’s owner had left his eyedropper at a previous show. Unable to clear his airways, Mike choked to death.

Photo 13 May 23 notes revolutionizeed:

Students take on the role of a farmer in a desolate African region trying to make ends meet and keep their family alive in this game.  Lessons on hunger, population, medicine, wealth, and more all in one small game!

revolutionizeed:

Students take on the role of a farmer in a desolate African region trying to make ends meet and keep their family alive in this game.  Lessons on hunger, population, medicine, wealth, and more all in one small game!


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